9441

Treasures Program Comprehensive Bibliography

Bibliography »

 

Adams, M. J.The Elusive Phoneme: Why Phonemic Awareness Is So Important and How to Help Children Develop It.” American Educator 22 (1998): 18–29. 

 

Adams, M. J., B. R. Foorman, I. Lundberg, and T. Beeler. Phonemic Awareness in Young Children. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 1998.

 

Castiglioni-Spalten, M. and Linnea C. Ehri. “Phonemic Awareness Instruction: Contribution of Articulatory Segmentation to Novice Beginners’ Reading and Spelling.” Scientific Studies of Reading 7(1) (2003): 25–52. 

 

Joseph, L. M. “Developing First Graders’ Phonemic Awareness, Word Identification and Spelling: A Comparison of Two Contemporary Phonic Instructional Approaches.” Reading Research and Instruction 39 (2000): 160–169.

 

Moats, L. C. Speech to Print: Language Essentials for Teachers. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 2000.

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Report of the National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

 

O’Connor, R. E., A. Notari-Syverson, and P. F. Vadasy. Ladders to Literacy: A Kindergarten Activity Book. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 1998.

 

Torgesen, J., and C. Davis. “Individual Differences Variables That Predict Response to Training in Phonological Awareness.” Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 63, no. 1 (1996): 1–21.

 

Torgesen, J. K., and P. Mathes. A Basic Guide to Understanding, Assessing, and Teaching Phonological Awareness. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed, 2000.

 

Yopp, H. K., and R. E. Yopp. Oo-pples and Boo-noo-noos. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2000.

 
 
 

Adams, M. J. Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning About Print. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1990.

 

Bear, D. Words Their Way: Word Study for Phonics, Vocabulary and Spelling Instruction.Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2008.

 

Bear, D. Words Their Way with English Learners: Word Study for Phonics, Vocabulary and Spelling Instruction. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.

 

Beck, I. L. Making Sense of Phonics. New York: Guilford, 2006.

 

Beck, I. L., and C. Juel. “The Role of Decoding in Learning to Read.” In What Research Has to Say About Reading Instruction, edited by S. J. Samuels and A. E. Farstrup. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 1992.

 

Ehri, L. C. “Phases of Acquisition in Learning to Read Words and Implications for Teaching.” In Learning and Teaching Reading, edited by R. Stainthorp and P. Tomlinson. London: British Journal of Educational Psychology Monograph Series II, 2002.

 

Ehri, L. C. “Grapheme-Phoneme Knowledge Is Essential for Learning to Read Words in English.” In J. L. Metsala and L. C. Ehri, eds., Word Recognition in Beginning Literacy, 3–40. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1998.

 

Hall, S. L., and L. C. Moats. Straight Talk About Reading: How Parents Can Make a Difference in the Early Years. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1999.

 

McCandliss, Bruce, I. L. Beck, R. Sandak, and C. Perfetti. “Focusing Attention on Decoding for Children with Poor Reading Skills: Design and Preliminary Tests of the Word Building Intervention.” Scientific Studies of Reading 7(1) (2003): 75–104.

 

Moats, L. C. Speech to Print: Language Essentials for Teachers. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 2000.

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Report of the National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

 

 Roberts, T. A ., and A.  Meiring.  “Teaching Phonics in the Context of Children’s Literature or Spelling: Influences on First-Grade Reading, Spelling, and Writing and Fifth-Grade Comprehension.” Journal of Educational Psychology 98(2006): 690–713.

 

Stahl, S., A. Duffy-Hester, and K. Stahl. “Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics (but Were Afraid to Ask).” Reading Research Quarterly 33(1998): 338–355.

 

Templeton, S., and D. R. Bear, eds. Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1992.

 

Wagner, R. K., J. K. Torgeson, P. Laughon, and C. A. Simmons Rashotte. “Development of Young Readers’ Phonological Processing Abilities.” Journal of Educational Psychology 85 (1993): 83–103.

 
 
 

Aronoff, M. “Morphology.” In Purves, A. C., L. Papa, and S. Jordan, eds., Encyclopedia of English Studies and Language Arts, Vol. 2 (pp. 820–821). New York: Scholastic, 1994.

 

Ayers, D. M. English Words from Latin and Greek Elements (2nd ed.; revised by Thomas Worthen). Tucson, AZ: The University of Arizona Press, 1986.

 

Baumann, J. F., E. C. Edwards, G. Font, C. A. Tereshinski, E. J. Kame’enui, S. Olejnik. “Teaching Morphemic and Contextual Analysis to Fifth-Grade Students.” Reading Research Quarterly 37 (2) (2002): 150–176. 

 

Baumann, J., and E. J. Kame’enui, eds. Vocabulary Instruction: Research to Practice. New York: Guilford Press, 2004.

 

Bear, D. Words Their Way: Word Study for Phonics, Vocabulary and Spelling Instruction. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2008.

 

Bear, D. Words Their Way with English Learners: Word Study for Phonics, Vocabulary and Spelling Instruction. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.

 

Beck, I. L., M. G. McKeown, and L. Kucan. Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction. New York: Guilford Press, 2002.

 

Blachowicz, C. L. Z., and P. Fisher. “Vocabulary Instruction.” In M. L. Kamil, P. B. Mosenthal, P. D. Pearson, and R. Barr, eds., Handbook of Reading Research. Vol. III.Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

 

Carlisle, J. F., and C. A. Stone. “Exploring the Role of Morphemes in Reading.” Reading Research Quarterly 40 (4) (2005): 428–449.

 

Cunningham, P. M. “The Multisyllabic Word Dilemma: Helping Students Build Meaning, Spell, and Read ‘Big’ Words.” Reading and Writing Quarterly 14 (1998): 189–218.

 

Diamond, L., and L. Gutlohn. Vocabulary Handbook. Berkeley, CA: CORE, 2006.

 

Graves, M. F. The Vocabulary Book. New York: Teachers College Press, 2006.

 

Hart, B., and T. Risley. Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experiences of Young American Children. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 1995.

 

Hiebert, E. H., and M. L. Kamil, eds. Teaching and Learning Vocabulary: Bringing Research to Practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005.

 

Marzano, R. J., and D. J. Pickering. Building Academic Vocabulary Teacher’s Manual. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2005.

 

Nagy, W. Teaching Vocabulary to Improve Reading Comprehension. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2002.

 

Nagy, W. E., and J. A. Scott. “Vocabulary Processes.” In M. L. Kamil, P. B. Mosenthal, P. D. Pearson, and R. Barr, eds. Handbook of Reading Research. Vol. III. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Report of the National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

 

Stahl, S. A. Vocabulary Development. Brookline, MA: Brookline Books, 1999.

 

Stahl, S., and B. Kapinus. Word Power: What Every Educator Needs to Know About Teaching Vocabulary. Washington, DC: National Education Association, 2001.

 

Stahl, S., and W. Nagy. Teaching Word Meanings. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2006. 

 

Wagner, R. K., A. E. Muse, and K. R. Tannenbaum. Vocabulary Acquisition Implications for Reading Comprehension. New York: Guilford Press, 2006.

 
 
 
 

Block, C., and M. Pressley. Comprehension Instruction: Research-Based Best Practices. New York: Guilford Press, 2001. 

 

Block, C. C., L. B. Gambrell, and M. Pressley. Improving Comprehension Instruction. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley and Sons, 2002.

 

Dole, J. A. “Professional Development in Reading Comprehension Instruction.” In Rethinking Reading Comprehension Instruction, edited by A. P. Sweet and C. E. Snow.New York: Guilford Press, 2003. 

 

Dole, J. A. “Explicit and Implicit Instruction in Comprehension.” In Reading for Meaning: Fostering Comprehension in the Middle Grades, edited by B. M. Taylor, P. van den Brock, and M. Graves. New York: Teachers College Press, 2000.  

 

Frey, N., and D. Fisher. Reading for Information in Elementary School: Content Literacy Strategies to Build Comprehension. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2007.

 

Hiebert, E. H., and M. L. Kamil, eds. Teaching and Learning Vocabulary: Bringing Research to Practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005.

 

Liang, L. A., and J. A. Dole. “Help with Reading Comprehension: Comprehension Instructional Frameworks.” The Reading Teacher, 58 (2006): 2–13.

 

Nagy, W. Teaching Vocabulary to Improve Reading Comprehension. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2002.

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Report of the National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

 

Oczkus, L. D. Reciprocal Teaching at Work: Strategies for Improving Reading Comprehension. Newark, DE: International Reading Assocation, 2003.

 

Paris, S. G., and S. A. Stahl. Current Issues in Reading Comprehension and Assessment. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2005.

 

Pressley, M., and V. Woloshyn. Cognitive Strategy Instruction That Really Improves Children’s Academic Performance. Cambridge: Brookline Press, 1995.

 

RAND Reading Study Group. Reading for Understanding: Toward an R&D Program in Reading Comprehension. Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 2002.

 

 Rosenshine, B. , and C.  Meister. “ Reciprocal Teaching: A Review of the Research.” Review of Educational Research 64 (1996): 479–530.

 

 Taylor, B. M ., P. D. Pearson, D. S.  Peterson,  and M. C.  Rodriguez . “ Reading Growth in High-Poverty Classrooms: The Influence of Teacher Practices That Encourage Cognitive Engagement in Literacy Learning.” Elementary School Journal 104 (2003): 3–28.

 

Wilhelm, J. D. Action Strategies for Deepening Comprehension. New York: Scholastic, 2002.

 

Wilhelm, J. D. Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies: Modeling What Good Readers Do. New York: Scholastic, 2001.

 

Wilhelm, J. D. Reading Is Seeing. New York: Scholastic, 2004.

 

 Williams, J. P ., K. M.  Hall,  K. D.  Lauer,  K. B.  Stafford,  L. A.  DeSisto,  and J. S.  deCani.  “ Expository Text Comprehension in the Primary Grade Classroom.” Journal of Educational Psychology 97 (2005): 538–550.

 
 
 

Breznitz, Z. Fluency in Reading: Synchronization of Process. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2005. 

 

Fuchs, L. S., D. Fuchs, M. K. Hosp, and J. R. Jenkins. “Oral Reading Fluency as an Indicator of Reading Competence: A Theoretical, Empirical, and Historical Analysis.” Scientific Studies of Reading 5, no. 3 (2001): 239–256.

 

Hasbrouck, J., and G. A. Tindal. “Oral Reading Fluency Norms: A Valuable Assessment Tool for Reading Teachers.” The Reading Teacher, 59, no. 7 (2006): 636–644.

 

 Hiebert, E. , and C.  Fisher.  “ A Review of the National Reading Panel’s Studies on Fluency: The Role of Text.” Elementary School Journal 105 (2005): 443–460.

 

Kuhn, M. R., and S. A. Stahl. “Fluency: A Review of Developmental and Remedial Practices.” Journal of Educational Psychology 95(1) (2003): 3–21.

 

 Miller, J., and P. J.  Schwanenflugel . “Prosody of Syntactically Complex Sentences in the Oral Reading of Young Children.” Journal of Educational Psychology 98 (2006): 839–853.

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Report of the National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

 

Rasinski, T. The Fluent Reader: Oral Reading Strategies for Building Word Recognition, Fluency, and Comprehension. New York: Scholastic Professional Books, 2003.

 

Rasinski, T., C. Blachowicz, and C. Lems (eds.). Fluency Instruction. New York: Guilford Press, 2006.

 

Rasinski, T. V., and J. V. Hoffman. “Oral Reading in the School Literacy Curriculum.” Reading Research Quarterly 38 (2003): 510–522.

 

Stahl, S. A., and M. R. Kuhn. “Fluency: A Review of Developmental and Remedial Practice.” Journal of Educational Psychology 95 (2003): 3–21. 

 

Torgesen, J. K., and R. Hudson. “Reading Fluency: Critical Issues for Struggling Readers.” In Reading Fluency: The Forgotten Dimension of Reading Success, edited by S. J. Samuels and A. Farstrup. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2006.

 
 
 

Bennett-Armistead, V. S., and N. Duke. Reading and Writing Informational Text in the Primary Grades: Research-Based Practices. New York: Scholastic Teaching Resources, 2003.

 

Fisher, D., and N. Frey. Scaffolding Writing Instruction: A Gradual Release Model. New York: Scholastic, 2007.

 

Fitzgerald, J., and T. Shanahan. “Reading and Writing Relations and Their Development.” Educational Psychologist 35(2000): 39–51.

 

Fletcher, R., and J. Portalupi. Craft Lessons: Teaching Writing K–8. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers, 1998.

 

Fletcher, R., and J. Portalupi. Nonfiction Craft Lessons: Teaching Information Writing K–8. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers, 2001.

 

MacArthur, C. A., S. Graham, and J. Fitzgerald. Handbook of Writing Research. New York: Guilford, 2006.

 

Seeing with New Eyes: A Guidebook for Teaching and Assessing Beginning Writers Using the Six-Trait Writing Model. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 1999.

 

Shanahan, T. “Relations Among Oral Language, Reading, and Writing Development.” In Handbook of Writing Research edited by C. A. MacArthur, S. Graham, and J. Fitzgerald. New York: Guilford, 2006. 

 
 
 

Carnine, D. W., J. Silbert, E. J. Kame’enui, S. G. Tarver, and K. Jongjohann. Teaching Struggling and At-Risk Readers: A Direct Instruction Approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2006.

 

Carnine, D. W., M. Coyne, and E. J. Kame’enui. Effective Teaching Strategies That Accommodate Diverse Learners. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2007.

 

Ehri, L. C., and S. McCormick. “Phases of Word Learning: Implications for Instruction with Delayed and Disabled Readers.” Reading and Writing Quarterly 14 (1998): 135–163.

 

Elbaum, B., S. Vaughn, M. Hughes, and S. Moody. “Grouping Practices and Reading Outcomes for Students with Disabilities.” Exceptional Children 65, no. 3 (1998): 399–425.

 

Fountas, I. C., and G. S. Pinnell. Guided Reading: Good First Teaching for All Children. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1996.

 

Gibson, V., and J. Hasbrouck. Differentiating Instruction: Grouping for Success.

New York: McGraw-Hill, 2007.
 

Hall, S. I’ve DIBEL’D Now What?Longmont, CO: Sopris West Educational Services, 2005.

 

Kulik, J. A. An Analysis of the Research on Ability Grouping: Historical and Contemporary Perspective. Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut, 1992.

 

Schumm, J. S. (ed.). Reading Assessment and Instruction for All Learners. New York: Guilford Press, 2006.

 

Tomlinson, C. A. How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2001.

 

Tyner, B. Small-Group Reading Instruction: A Differentiated Teaching Model for Beginning and Struggling Readers. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2003.

 

Vaughn, S., S. Linan-Thompson, K. Kouzekanani, D. P. Bryant, S. Dickson, and S. A. Blozis. “Reading Instruction Grouping for Students with Reading Difficulties.” Remedial and Special Education 24, no. 5 (2003): 301–315.

 
 
 

August, D., and T. Shanahan, eds. Developing Reading and Writing in Second Language Learners: Lessons from the Report of the National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2007.

 

Bear, D. R., and L. Helman. “Word Study for Vocabulary Development: An Ecological Perspective on Instruction During the Early Stages of Literacy Learning.” In J. F. Baumann and E. J. Kame’enui, eds. Vocabulary Instruction: Research to Practice. New York: Guilford Press, 2004.

 

Bear, D. R., L. Helman, M. Invernizzi, S. R. Templeton, and F. Johnston. Words Their Way with English Learners: Word Study for Spelling, Phonics, and Vocabulary Instruction.Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2006. 

Carlo, M. S., D. August, B. McLaughlin, C. E. Snow, C. Dressler, D. N. Lippman, T. J. Lively, and C. E. White. “Closing the Gap: Addressing the Vocabulary Needs of English-Language Learners in Bilingual and Mainstream Classrooms.” Reading Research Quarterly 39 (2) (2004): 188–215. 

 

Echevarria, J., D. Short, and K. Powers. “School Reform and Standards-Based Education: A Model for English-Language Learners.” The Journal of Educational Research 99(4) (2006): 195–210. 

 

Echevarria, J., M. Vogt, and D. J. Short. Making Content Comprehensible for English Language Learners: The SIOP Model.3rd ed. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2008.

 

Fisher, D., and C. Rothenberg. Teaching English Language Learners: A Differentiated Approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2007.

 

Hurley, S., and J. Tinajero, eds. Literacy Assessment of Second Language Learners. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2001.

 

Saunders, W. M., B. R. Foorman, and C. D. Carlson. “Is a Separate Block of Time for Oral English Language Development in Programs for English Learners Needed?” Elementary School Journal, 107(2) (2006): 181–198.

 

Snow, C. E., and Y-S Kim. “Large Problem Spaces: The Challenge of Vocabulary for English Language Learners.” In R. K. Wagner, A. E. Muse, and K. R. Tannenbaum. Vocabulary Acquisition: Implications for Reading Comprehension. New York: Guilford Press, 2007.

 

Tinajero, J., and R. DeVillar, eds. The Power of Two Languages: Effective Dual-Language Use Across the Curriculum. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2000.

 
 
 

Alvermann, D. E., J. Swafford, and M. K. Montero. Content Area Instruction for the Elementary Grades. Boston: Pearson, 2004.

 

Armbruster, B. B., and J. Osborn. Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read. Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy, 2001.

 

Bear, D. R. “Close Looks in a Literacy Center.” In D. H. Evensen and P. B. Mosenthal, eds. Reconsidering the Role of the Reading Clinic in a New Age of Literacy; Advances in Reading/Language Arts 6 (1999): 213–248.

 

Beck, I., M. McKeown, R. Hamilton, and L. Kucan. Questioning the Author: An Approach for Enhancing Student Engagement with Text. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 1997.

 

Bennett-Armistead, V. S., and N. Duke. Reading and Writing Informational Text in the Primary Grades: Research-Based Practices. New York: Scholastic Teaching Resources, 2003.

 

Carnine, D. W., J. Silbert, E. J. Kame’enui, and S. G. Tarver. Direct Instruction Reading.4th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2004.

 

Cooper, J. D., D. J. Chard, and N. D. Kiger. The Struggling Reader. New York: Scholastic, 2006.

 

Foorman, B., ed. Preventing and Remediating Reading Difficulties. Baltimore, MD: York Press, 2003.

 

Fountas, I. C., and G. S. Pinnell. Guided Reading: Good First Teaching for All Children. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1996.

 

Frey, N., and D. Fisher. Language Arts Workshop: Purposeful Reading and Writing Instruction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2006.

 

Frey, N., and D. Fisher. Reading for Information in Elementary School: Content Literacy Strategies to Build Comprehension. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2007.

 

Hasbrouck, J., and C. Denton. The Reading Coach: A How-To Manual for Success. Longmont, CO: Sopris West Educational Services, 2005.

 

Honig, B., L. Diamond, L. Gutlohn, and J. Mahler. Teaching Reading: Sourcebook for Kindergarten Through Eighth Grade (Core Literacy Training Series). Novato, CA: Arena Press, 2000.

 

International Reading Association. Evidence-Based Reading Instruction: Putting the National Reading Panel Report into Practice. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2002. 

 

Kamil, M. L., P. B. Mosenthal, P. D. Pearson, and R. Barr, eds. Handbook of Reading Research. Vol. III. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000. 

 

Kamil, M. L., J. Langer, and T. Shanahan. Understanding Reading and Writing Research. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1985.

 

Klingner, J. K., S. Vaughn, and A. Boardman. Teaching Reading Comprehension to Students with Learning Disabilities. New York: Guilford, 2007. 

Labo, L. D., and W. H. Teale. “Cross-Age Reading: A Strategy for Helping Poor Readers.” The Reading Teacher 43, no. 6 (1990): 362–369.

 

Lapp, D., C. C. Block, E. J. Cooper, J. Flood, N. Roser, and J. V. Tinajero. Teaching All the Children: Strategies for Developing Literacy in an Urban Setting. New York: Guilford Press, 2004.

 

Marzano, R. J. Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement: Research on What Works in Schools. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2004.

 

Marzano, R. J., D. J. Pickering, and J. E. Pollock. Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2001.

 

Mathes, P., C. Denton, J. Fletcher, J. Anthony, D. Francis, and C. Schatschneider. “The Effects of Theoretically Different Instruction and Student Characteristics on the Skills of Struggling Readers.” Reading Research Quarterly 40, no. 2 (2005): 148–182.

 

Mathes, P. G., and L. S. Fuchs. “The Efficacy of Peer Tutoring in Reading for Students with Mild Disabilities: A Best-Evidence Synthesis.” School Psychology Review 23, no. 1 (1994): 59–80.

 

Morris, D., B. Tyner, J. Perney. “Early Steps: Replicating the Effects of a First-Grade Reading Intervention Program.” Journal of Educational Psychology 92(4) (2000): 681–693. 

 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Report of the National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

 

Pressley, M. Reading Instruction That Works: The Case for Balanced Teaching. New York: Guilford, 1998.

 

Pressley, M., R. L. Allington, R. Wharton-McDonald, C. C. Block, and L. M. Morrow. Learning to Read. Lessons from Exemplary First-Grade Classrooms. New York: Guilford, 2001.

 

Shanahan, T. “A Special Section on Reading Research: But Does It Really Matter?” Phi Delta Kappan 86, no. 6 (2005): 452.

 

Shanahan, T. The National Reading Panel Report: Practical Advice for Teachers. Naperville, IL: Learning Point Associates, 2005.

 

Shaywitz, S. Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level. New York: Knopf, 2003.

 

Snow, C. E., M. S. Burns, and P. Griffin, eds. Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1998.

 

Strickland, D. S., and D. E. Alvermann. Bridging the Literacy Achievement Gap, Grades 4–12. New York: Teachers College Press, 2004.

 

Swartz, S., R. E. Shook, A. F. Klein, D. Wakefield, C. Huntley. Shared Reading: Reading with Children.Upper Saddle River, NJ: Dominie Press (Pearson Education), 2002.

 

Tierney, R. J., and J. E. Readence. Reading Strategies and Practices: A Compendium. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2006.

 

Vaughn, S., and S. Linan-Thompson. Research-Based Methods of Reading Instruction: Grades K–3. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2004.

 

Vellutino, F. R., and D. M. Scanlon. “Emergent Literacy Skills, Early Instruction, and Individual Differences as Determinants of Difficulties in Learning to Read: The Case for Early Intervention.” In S. B. Neuman and D. K. Dickinson, eds. Handbook of Early Literacy Research. New York: Guilford Press, 2001.

 

Wong, H. K., and R. T. Wong. How to Be an Effective Teacher: The First Days of School. Mountain View, CA: Harry K. Wong Publications, 2004. 

 
 
 

Armbruster, B. B., F. Lehr, and J. M. Osborn, eds. Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read. Jessup, MD: National Institute for Literacy at ED Pubs, 2001.

 

Bear, D., C. Caserta-Henry, and D. Venner. Personal Readers for Emergent and Beginning Readers. San Diego, CA: Teaching Resource Center, 2004.

 

Bear, D. R., and L. Helman. “Word Study for Vocabulary Development: An Ecological Perspective on Instruction During the Early Stages of Literacy Learning.” In J. F. Baumann and E. J. Kame’enui, eds. Vocabulary Instruction: Research to Practice.New York: Guilford Press, 2004.

 

Biemiller, A. “The Development of the Use of Graphic and Contextual Information as Children Learn to Read.” Reading Research Quarterly 6, no. 1 (1970): 75–96.

 

Burns, M. S., P. Griffin, and C. E. Snow. Starting Out Right: A Guide to Promoting Children’s Reading Success. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1999.

 

Charity, A. H., H. S. Scarborough, and D. M. Griffin. “Familiarity with School English in African American Children and Its Relation to Early Reading Achievement.” Child Development 75, no. 5 (2004): 1340–1356.

 

Dickinson, D., and S. Neuman, eds. Handbook of Early Literacy Research. Vol. I. New York: Guilford Press, 2002.

 

Dickinson, D., and S. Neuman, eds. Handbook of Early Literacy Research. Vol. II. New York: Guilford Press, 2006.

 

Duke, N. K. “Print Environments and Experiences Offered to First-Grade Students in Very Low – and Very High – SES School Districts.” Reading Research Quarterly 35 (4) (2000): 456–457. 

 

Fountas, I. C., and G. S. Pinnell. Guided Reading: Good First Teaching for All Children. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1996.

 

Juel, C. “Beginning Reading.” In R. Barr, M. L. Kamil, P. B. Mosenthal, and P. D. Pearson, eds., Handbook of Reading Research. Vol. II. 759–788. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1991.

 

McCardle, P., and V. Chabra. The Voice of Evidence in Reading Research. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., 2004.

 

Strickland, D. S., and L. M. Morrow. Beginning Reading and Writing. New York: Teachers College Press, 2000. 

 
 
 

Borrentine, S., and S. Stokes, eds. Reading Assessment: Principles and Practices for Elementary Teachers. 2nd ed. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2005.

 

Dickinson, D. K., A. McCabe, and K. Sprague. “Teacher Rating of Oral Language and Literacy (TROLL): Individualizing Early Literacy Instruction with a Standards-Based Rating Tool.” The Reading Teacher 56(6) (2003): 554–564. 

 

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Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement http://www.ciera.org/

Education Commission of the States http://www.ecs.org

Florida Center for Reading Research http://www.fcrr.org/

The International Dyslexia Association http://www.interdys.org/

International Reading Association http://reading.org/

International Reading Association: Reading Online   www.readingonline.org

National Association for the Education of Young Children http://www.naeyc.org/ 

National Institute for Early Education Research http://nieer.org/

National Institute for Literacy http://nifl.gov/

National Institutes of Health: Office of Science Education http://science-education.nih.gov/

National Reading Panel http://www.nationalreadingpanel.org/

Pacific Resources for Education and Learning http://www.prel.org/

Vaughn Gross Center for Reading and Language Arts  http://texasreading.org/utcrla/

What Works Clearinghouse http://www.whatworks.ed.gov/
Texas Education Agency http://www.tea.org/